Get into mini-comics this summer

David | April 28, 2016
Intro to Mini Comics

Joe Lupo, associate professor and coordinator of printmaking in WVU’s School of Art and Design, will offer his popular Intro to Mini-Comics course, Art 493A, from May 16 to June 3.

“In this course, we both research the history of 20th Century independent American comics and learn about strategies to make our own mini-comics,” said Lupo.

Students read well-known comics like “Maus” and “Persepolis” that deal with autobiographic subject matter, along with books like “The Comic Book History of Conics” and “Understanding Comics” that delve into the history and creation of comics.

The class also makes their own comics, though no prior skills are needed to take this class.

“We will investigate all kinds of methods to create imagery and text, so students can use the style and approach that best fits them,” Lupo said. Students will make daily autobiographical comics and six non-fiction mini comics throughout the three-week course.

At the end of the course, the class will publish a collaborative comic titled “Yard Sale,” which is annually printed and distributed at regional comic shops like Copacetic Comics in Pittsburgh.

For more information, contact Lupo at 304-293-2703 or Joseph.Lupo@mail.wvu.edu.

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Students in West Virginia University’s ceramics program have taken technology into their own hands, creating a 3D printer with the help of another 3D printer.

The project came together with help from Bryan Czibesz, a professor at SUNY New Paltz.

“Bryan redesigned a Delta DC ceramic extrusion printer by Jonathan Keep that he found on line on an open source site called Thingverse,” said Kelly O’Briant, a post-doctoral fellow in WVU’s School of Art and Design. “He redesigned it to be larger, more durable, and easily made using a plastic printer, a computer numerical control CNC machine, and wood shop equipment.”

Here at WVU, ceramics students worked with Shanti Hamburg of the Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources create the wood parts for the base and top supports, learning to use a manual milling machine and CNC router.

“We ended up using the CNC router courtesy of David DeVallance in the School of Forestry and Natural Resources, and Benjamin Groover, manager of network services for the Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design.

“It was quite a process because this is the one machine we don’t have in ceramics,” said O’Briant. “But, it was great because students got to have the experience of networking with other departments, and now those folks are interested in what we are doing.”

With Czibesz’s files, the students printed the plastic parts in WVU’s production ceramics studio with MakerBots and MakerGear printers.

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“When Bryan arrived on Wednesday night, he looked over all of the inventory we’d collected,” O’Briant said. On Thursday morning, we all met at the studio and began assembly.” There were a core group of grads here for the duration and several students who came and went based on class schedules.

By the end of the day Thursday, they had both printers assembled and one printer printing. Students learned how to prepare the porcelain paste, how to control print speed and air pressure in order to control the printer, how to upload their own files and a little software information.

“On Friday, we had the second printer running by mid-day,” O’Briant continued. “Bryan said this group was a little different than many others he does workshops with because the students in this class now have substantial experience with 3D modeling software already.”

Since then, several students have printed on our new printers and they continue to be very excited about it.

“Bryan’s workshop helped the students to gain a concise introduction of the printer’s abilities and the possibilities on how to incorporate 3-D technology into our work by showing examples of his work and others who are working in similar methods,” said George Cho, a graduate student in WVU’s ceramics studio. “His expertise in printing with clay helped to clarify some technical issues and the material process involved in preparations for printing 3-D ceramic object.”

Cho notes that “through virtual design, artists are now able to create forms that were previously impossible to create by hand. As well as creating complex forms, artists can expand their visual language through incorporating 3-D printed pieces with their own work.”

“Each step of ceramic making requires a specialized understanding of materials and processes, and the delta printer is no exception,” said Brandon Schnur, a graduate student in WVU’s ceramics studio. “As a tactile artist, my excitement for hand building a machine that can enrich my ability to do what I already love may seem unexplainable to anyone who doesn’t hold the same kind of affinity for the process.”

While Schnur’s favorite tools will always be his own two hands, he’s intrigued by the potential of a 3D printer to supplement a ceramicist’s work.

“The machine is not here to make your work for you, but it is the equivalent of having a second pan in your kitchen,” Schnur said. “There is no magic pill that you can place into the microwave and receive a full meal, but you can make a much more efficient dinner when you aren’t limited to one pan.”

“Building a printer from the bottom up allows students to gain a deeper understanding of how the machine works and what it can do,” O’Briant said. “It links ceramics to the digital world in a very interesting way. These printers print clay! What more can you ask for from a 3D printer?”

Makers Challenge 2016

Two new student organizations at West Virginia University awarded prizes during the first-ever Mountaineer Maker’s Challenge on Friday, April 22.

The competition, sponsored by the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and student organizations Material Advantage and Materials Research Society, challenged students to create and print a unique 3D design that could be judged in one of four categories: best artistic design, best West Virginia pride, best mechanized design and open design.

The challenge of designing and printing a unique design wasn’t just for fun. According to Edward Sabolsky, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, the competition was created to bring visibility to the new materials science and engineering program in the Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources.

“Materials science and engineering involves the discovery and design of new materials, so maker’s challenges are often used to spark interest in the field,” said Sabolsky. “Because it’s a new program at WVU and is currently only offered at the masters and doctoral level, we thought a maker’s challenge would be a good way to introduce the program to our current undergraduate students.”

In total, 19 entries were received and voting was open to students, faculty and staff. Prizes were awarded in the following categories:

Best Artistic Design: first place – Bryan Jackson, mechanical engineering; second place – Brandon Schnur, ceramics third place – Ken Lu Yong Jion, ceramics

Best Mechanized Design: first place – Chris Guffey, ceramics, and Ken Lu Yong Jion

Best Mountaineer Pride: first place – Nathan Owen, general engineering; second place – Lee Chirpas, mechanical engineering; third place – Brandon Schnur

Open: first place – Andrew Kellner, ceramics; second place – Ken Lu Yong Jion; third place – George Cho, ceramics

The Statler College Dean’s Office and Office of Outreach and Recruitment also played a vital role in advertising the competition and providing prizes for the winners. Sabolsky and the student organizations involved have big plans for next year’s Mountaineer Maker’s Challenge, which they plan to host during the Statler College’s Engineers Week celebration in February.

“Our vision is to involve K-12 students and students from majors throughout WVU to interact, design and create,” said Sabolsky. “We want to use the Mountaineer Maker’s Challenge as a tool to celebrate engineering throughout West Virginia.”

—By Bernadette Dombrowski, Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources
Spring Dance Showcase 2016

All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For more information about ticketed events, call 304.293.SHOW. For information about any College of Creative Arts events, call the Publicity Office at 304.293.3397. Events on this calendar are subject to change. For the latest information, see our web calendar at http://ccarts.wvu.edu.

All College of Creative Arts programs, services, and activities are accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations, call 304.293.4171.

Monday, April 25
WORKSHOP: The Bennett House
Two dozen students from West Virginia University’s School of Theatre and Dance will get the opportunity to help shepherd “Pride and Prejudice” to Broadway. The students will participate in a workshop production – of “The Bennett House” at 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 25, in the Vivian Davis Michael Theatre of the Creative Arts Center. “The Bennett House” is a new musical loosely based on Jane Austen’s beloved comedy of manners. The workshop is free and open to the public. Seating in the Vivian Davis Michael Theatre is limited, so audience members should plan to arrive early.

Tuesday, April 26
ART UP CLOSE: Shoji Satake
What does an Iznik pottery plate made in Asia Minor during the 17th century have in common with a plate made by a Chinese artist in 1999? How are they different? What materials and techniques did the artists use? These two works from the WVU Art Collection will be the subject of the Art Museum of WVU’s next Art Up Close event, to be held at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 26. Shoji Satake, who is coordinator of the Ceramics Program in the WVU School of Art and Design, will compare and contrast the ceramic plate from 17th century Anatolia with a contemporary plate created by artist Yu Yong in 1999.

CONCERT: Chamber Winds
Chamber Winds ensemble will conclude their 2015-16 concert season at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 26, in the Gladys G. Davis Theatre of the Creative Arts Center. The concert is free and open to the public. John Weigand, professor of clarinet and director of the ensemble, will lead the woodwind ensemble in works by Carl Reinecke, Andre Caplet, and Antonin Dvořák.

Wednesday, April 27
LUNCHTIME LOOK: Diego Rivera
Art Museum of WVU docent Art Jacknowitz will discuss a watercolor by Mexican artist Diego Rivera during the next Lunchtime Looks program on Wednesday, April 27. WVU students, faculty and staff, and the general public are invited to bring a brown bag lunch to the Museum Education Center Grand Hall at noon and meet with other art enthusiasts to enjoy their midday meal. At 12:30 p.m., the group will move to the Museum Classroom on the ground floor for a 20-minute, in-depth look at Rivera’s watercolor on rice paper.

SCREENING: Tough Love
A pair of School of Theatre & Dance alumni have taken success into their own hands, and they’re coming back to share their experiences in creating original content and the brave new world of digital distribution with students at their alma mater. They’ll screen all 6 episodes – of Season Three of “Tough Love” and host a question-and-answer session about creating original content and the wide range of new distribution channels at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 27, in the Gladys G. Davis Theatre of the Creative Arts Center.

Thursday, April 28, and Friday, April 29
CONCERT: Spring Dance Showcase
Dance students have been building their Spring Dance Showcase from the ground up. The concerts will be held at 7 and 9 p.m. Thursday, April 28, and 7 and 9 p.m. Friday, April 29, in the Edna Falbo Theatre in WVU’s Creative Arts Center. For tickets and information, please contact the WVU Box Office at 304-293-SHOW.

Friday, April 29, through Sunday, May 1
LAB Theatre: There’s a Darkness Around Me That’s Flooded in Light
WVU’s LAB Theatre program will present a stage reading of School of Theatre and Dance student Woody Pond’s play, which, according to Pond, “tells the story of three swordsmen sitting on a couch, boozing and reminiscing as they attempt to pass the first stage of their final test – solving a SUPER HARD riddle.” Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday in the SLAB Theatre, 239A Creative Arts Center. Admission is free, but seating is limited, so audiences should arrive early.

Through Saturday, May 14
EXHIBITION: Bachelor of Fine Arts Show
Seniors graduating with a bachelor of fine arts degree in the WVU College of Creative Arts will exhibit their final projects in the Creative Arts Center’s Mesaros Galleries, April 14 through May 14. The Mesaros Galleries will be open during the College of Creative Arts Commencement ceremony, to be held Friday, May 13, at 4 p.m. in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre of the Creative Arts Center.

Through June 12
EXHIBITION: “Here to There”
Huntington area art lovers will get a chance to enjoy works by West Virginia University faculty members in an ongoing exhibition. “Here to There: An Exhibition of Work by WVU School of Art & Design Faculty” is on view at the Huntington Museum of Art through June 12.

Mark your calendars:

Ongoing

ART MUSEUM OF WVU: Exhibitions: Visual Conversations: Looking and Listening and Independent Vision: Self-Taught Artists from Appalachia
The Art Museum of WVU is open to the public Wednesday through Sunday, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. For more information, visit http://artmuseum.wvu.edu.

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
This year, West Virginia University will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Visit http://artsandhumanities.wvu.edu for more information and a calendar of events.

Art educators honor Giobbia, Ice

David | April 22, 2016

The West Virginia Art Education Association has recognized two West Virginia University employees for their contributions to the field.

Terese Giobbia, coordinator of the art education program in WVU’s School of Art and Design, was named this year’s recipient of the the Association’s Higher Education Art Educator of the Year Award. Joyce Ice, director of the Art Museum of WVU, was recognized for Distinguished Service Outside the Profession.

Terese Giobbia The purpose of the West Virginia Art Education Association is to advance West Virginia art education and promote the arts as essential elements in education programs.  To that end, WVAEA sponsors conferences, programs, and exhibits; produces a newsletter, maintains a website; provides a means for addressing common problems of art educators; seeks to educate the public about aims, purposes, and issues of art education; and works with other related agencies and organizations in support of art education.

“I was incredibly honored to have received this award,” Giobbia said. “I moved here last year from Illinois and have enjoyed working with all of the amazing and incredibly accomplished teachers and members who are part of this group.”

Giobbia’s research includes design and technology education, fashion as public art, and using design thinking and fashion in the K-12 art curriculum. She has conducted national and statewide workshops using a variety of unconventional materials such as duct tape, toilet paper and garbage bags as well as 3D printing techniques to create innovative fashion items and accessories. These techniques and materials are explored in her new book Everyday Fashion, scheduled for publication in 2017.

Joyce Ice Joyce Ice has been the director of the Art Museum of WVU since 2009 and oversaw the planning and development of the new building and its educational programs. Since opening in late August 2015, the museum has had approximately 5,000 visitors, including individual and group visits by the general public, as well as more than 1,200 students in pre-K through graduate school coming for class tours.

“I appreciate this award from the WVAEA, recognizing the contributions the Art Museum of WVU is making to art education in the state,” Ice said. “The exhibitions and programs serve teachers, as well as their students. We held Summer Teacher Institutes at the museum in 2010 and 2012, with the support of the West Virginia Humanities Council, and we plan to continue professional development activities for teachers in the future.”

The Art Museum was honored at this year’s Governor’s Arts Awards ceremony for excellence in the arts. It also recently received a 2016 “Best of Morgantown” Award given by Morgantown Magazine.

Nicole Peters

Nicole Peters has worked at archeological sites from Arizona to Egypt. The alumna of West Virginia University’s School of Art and Design returned to her alma mater to share some lessons learned in her work towards becoming a conservator.

Peters earned an undergraduate degree in ceramics and a master’s degree in art history from WVU. She’s currently in her third year as a Graduate Fellow in Art Conservation at Buffalo State, the State University of New York. But with hundreds of hours of required field work, she has spent a lot of time outside of upstate New York.

She’s currently finishing an internship in objects conservation at the Arizona State Museum in Tucson, after completing similar experiences in Indianapolis, at the National Museum of the American Indian, and in sites as far-flung as Alaska, Hawaii, and Amarna, Egypt.

In a class visit with J. Bernard Schultz Professor of Art History Janet Snyder’s students, she explained the work of a modern conservator.

“We’re trying to basically halt time, to make the unearthed object look cared for but not to falsify anything, or restore it to ‘like new,’” she said.

Students brought digital examples of archeological objects, and Peters offered insights on how to preserve and protect them. A lead tablet is made of a metal that is self-stabilizing, so Peters advised light cleansing rather than anything more intense.

“Exposing some metals to the air can cause massive, rapid corrosion,” she explained, which requires more immediate and extreme measures.

Of a wooden piece found in a cellar in the United Kingdom, Peters noted that “organics are exciting to find, since they degrade really quickly due to moisture and insects” and are subsequently rarer in the antiquities field. Depending on the material and the circumstance, conservators must make some quick and serious “triage” decisions at the excavation site.

“Pure gold is very malleable and subject to marking and damage,” she noted, looking at a picture of a jumble of jewelry made of different metals. Testing and thorough examination is the only way to tell for sure how much of a piece is metal and how much is corrosion, and whether the piece should even be moved.

A dig site can bring together a variety of different scholars with a range of agendas and approaches. Antiquities conservators have different priorities than physical anthropologists, who need to take precise measurements of human remains. But often, those remains are in the context of antiquities that can reveal volumes about their culture and its values.

Peters discussed one such incident from her experience of remains found at Amarna, Egypt. The physical anthropologists wanted to take precise cranial measurements, and the conservators wanted to preserve fragile and elaborate hairpieces. Working together, each constituency managed to get the information they needed, and to preserve the locks.

Sometimes, Peters acknowledged, a photographic image of the artifact or site is worth more than any actions a conservator can take.

“A lot of times, photographic documentation is the best hope for preserving the legacy of an object,” she said. “That’s why it’s important to take high resolution images before, during and after the removal of any object from its site.”

Peters, visiting as part of the College of Creative Arts Alumni in Residence series, also spoke at the Art Museum of WVU, discussing the on-site conservation treatment methods she used to preserve a child’s coffin in Tell-el Amarna, Egypt.

Iznik plate What does an Iznik pottery plate made in Asia Minor during the 17th century have in common with a plate made by a Chinese artist in 1999? How are they different? What materials and techniques did the artists use? These two works from the West Virginia University Art Collection will be the subject of the Art Museum of WVU’s next Art Up Close! event, to be held Tuesday, Feb. 26.

Shoji Satake, coordinator of the Ceramics Program in the WVU College of Creative Arts, will compare and contrast the ceramic plate from 17th century Anatolia with a contemporary plate created by artist Yu Yong in 1999.

“The talk will focus on Jingdezhen, China, as having a central role in the spread of porcelain and I’ll discuss how cultures throughout the world have fought, traded, begged and replicated ceramics,” he said.

Titled “La Maladie de Porcelaine: Porcelain Sickness,” his presentation begins at 5:30 p.m. in the Museum Education Center Grand Hall and will be followed by a question-and-answer session and light refreshments. Those attending will also be able to view the two ceramic works up close.

This program was originally scheduled on Feb. 9, but was cancelled due to a snowstorm.

Yu Yong Satake is coordinator of the WVU School of Art and Design’s ceramics program in Jingdezhen. He received his Master of Fine Arts degree in Ceramics from Indiana University, Bloomington, and his bachelor’s degree in Studio Art from The College of William and Mary. He has conducted workshops and exhibited nationally and internationally. Some of his most recent activities include the “Japan/USA Exhibition” at Santa Fe Clay, the 2004 Summer Visiting Artist Workshop at the University of Winnipeg, Manitoba, the Jingdezhen, China “1000 Years of Porcelain International Exhibition,” “Yellow Ball Project,” Antwerp, Belgium, and the exhibition “From Hoosier Hands” at the Richmond Fine Arts Museum in Richmond, Indiana.

Art Up Close! events are held several times each year and present WVU faculty and guest artists from various disciplines discussing a single work of art from the perspectives of their disciplines. Audience members have the opportunity to view the actual works of art at the programs.

Art Up Close! is co-sponsored by the Art Museum of WVU and the Friends of the Museum, a membership group for people who enjoy the arts and social, educational and cultural activities revolving around art.

For more information about the program on Feb. 9, contact the Art Museum of WVU at (304) 292-4359.

A watercolor by Diego Rivera

Art Museum of West Virginia University docent Art Jacknowitz will discuss a watercolor by Mexican artist Diego Rivera during the next “Lunchtime Looks” program on Wednesday, April 27.

WVU students, faculty and staff, and the general public are invited to bring a brown bag lunch to the Museum Education Center Grand Hall at noon and meet with other art enthusiasts to enjoy their midday meal. At 12:30 p.m., the group will move to the Museum Classroom on the ground floor for a 20-minute, in-depth look at Rivera’s watercolor on rice paper. The artwork was a gift to the museum from Ary “Bucky” and Constance “Connie” de Vries.

Audience members will have a chance to share their own reactions and questions about Rivera’s work.

The session will end by 12:50 p.m., so that those who need to get back to their offices will have plenty of time. Anyone who can’t get away for the entire hour is welcome to meet the group in the museum at 12:30 p.m. for just the art presentation.

Considered the greatest Mexican painter of the 20th century, Diego Rivera (1886-1957) has had a long lasting effect on the world of art.

“In this season of political discourse involving the country of Mexico and its citizens, it is noteworthy that Rivera had radical political views and felt that the foundation of history could be seen in the struggles of the working class,” Dr. Jacknowitz said. “The Art Museum of West Virginia University is fortunate to have in its collection one of his works. Although untitled and undated, it vividly depicts the life and social status of indigenous peoples.”

The Art Museum and Museum Education Center are located near the corner of Patteson Drive and Morrill Way at the Evansdale Campus North Entrance.

Parking is available in short-term lots ST-1 and ST-9, with pay stations, one located near Patteson Drive and the other near the new Evansdale Crossing.

For more information about the Lunchtime Looks program, contact the Art Museum of WVU at (304) 292-4359.

Arabian Nights

All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For more information about ticketed events, call 304.293.SHOW. For information about any College of Creative Arts events, call the Publicity Office at 304.293.3397. Events on this calendar are subject to change. For the latest information, see our web calendar at http://ccarts.wvu.edu.

All College of Creative Arts programs, services, and activities are accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations, call 304.293.4171.

Monday, April 18
ALUMNI-IN-RESIDENCE: Nicole Peters
Nicole Peters, who earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Ceramics and a Master of Arts in Art History from West Virginia University, will return to discuss “A holistic approach to the on-site conservation treatment of an Egyptian New Kingdom child coffin” at 6 p.m. Monday, April 18, in room G7 of the Art Museum of WVU. The coffin is from the Amarna period of ancient Egyptian culture and was done in painted wood. Peters is currently pursuing a Master of Arts in Art Conservation at Buffalo State. Her visit is part of the College of Creative Arts Alumni in Residence series.

Tuesday, April 19
CONCERT: WVU Wind Symphony
The April 19 performance of the West Virginia University Wind Symphony will be bittersweet for Director of Bands John Hendricks. It will be his last concert – at the conductor’s podium before he takes up new administrative responsibilities for the WVU College of Creative Arts. The concert will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre of the WVU Creative Arts Center. For tickets and information, contact the WVU Box Office at 304-293-SHOW. As with many School of Music performances, the concert is free to any WVU student who presents an ID to any usher.

Tuesday, April 19-Sunday, April 24
PLAY: The Arabian Nights
The West Virginia University School of Theatre and Dance will present the tales of “The Arabian Nights” by Mary Zimmerman at 7:30 p.m. April 19-23, and 2 p.m. April 24 in the Gladys G. Davis Theatre at the Creative Arts Center. As directed by Leland Blair, associate professor of acting, “Arabian Nights” will take the audience on a journey of love, riddles, danger, lust, and beyond. For tickets and information, please contact the WVU Box Office at 304-293-SHOW.

Thursday, April 21
LECTURE: Donatello and the Human Experience
An expert in Italian Renaissance art will share insights from his remarkable career as a scholar and educator in a lecture at West Virginia University. David Wilkins, Professor Emeritus at the University of Pittsburgh, will present the J. Bernard Schultz Endowed Lecture in Art History at 5 p.m. Thursday, April 21, in Bloch Learning and Performance Hall, 200A Creative Arts Center. He will discuss “Donatello and the Human Experience.”

CONCERT: WVU Symphony Orchestra
The West Virginia University Symphony Orchestra closes its 2015-2016 season with a concert on Thursday, April 21, that features retiring WVU faculty member William Skidmore as cello soloist in a farewell performance. The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre under the baton of Maestro Arnold. For concert tickets and information, call the WVU Box Office at 304.293.SHOW. WVU students are admitted free by presenting IDs to any usher.

Sunday, April 24
RECITAL: Cynthia Anderson
Cynthia Anderson, professor of oboe and music theory and director of graduate studies in the WVU School of Music, will present a faculty recital at 1 p.m. Sunday, April 24, in Bloch Learning and Performance Hall, 200A Creative Arts Center.

CONCERT: WVU Choral Concert
Audiences will enjoy an eclectic afternoon of music as West Virginia University’s choral ensembles take the stage at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 24, in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre of the Creative Arts Center. For tickets and information, please contact the WVU Box Office at 304-293-SHOW.

RECITAL: “A Fond Farewell”
After a 38-year career at West Virginia University, William Skidmore, professor of cello, will present his final recital before retiring, “A Fond Farewell,” at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 24, in Bloch Learning and Performance Hall, 200A Creative Arts Center.

Through Saturday, May 14
EXHIBITION: Bachelor of Fine Arts Show
Seniors graduating with a bachelor of fine arts degree in the WVU College of Creative Arts will exhibit their final projects in the Creative Arts Center’s Mesaros Galleries, April 14 through May 14. The Mesaros Galleries will be open during the College of Creative Arts Commencement ceremony, to be held Friday, May 13, at 4 p.m. in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre of the Creative Arts Center.

Through June 12
EXHIBITION: “Here to There”
Huntington area art lovers will get a chance to enjoy works by West Virginia University faculty members in an ongoing exhibition. “Here to There: An Exhibition of Work by WVU School of Art & Design Faculty” is on view at the Huntington Museum of Art through June 12.

Mark your calendars:

Ongoing

ART MUSEUM OF WVU: Exhibitions: Visual Conversations: Looking and Listening and Independent Vision: Self-Taught Artists from Appalachia
The Art Museum of WVU is open to the public Wednesday through Sunday, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. For more information, visit http://artmuseum.wvu.edu.

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
This year, West Virginia University will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Visit http://artsandhumanities.wvu.edu for more information and a calendar of events.

wilkins An expert in Italian Renaissance art will share insights from his remarkable career as a scholar and educator in a lecture at West Virginia University.

David Wilkins, Professor Emeritus at the University of Pittsburgh, will present the J. Bernard Schultz Endowed Lecture in Art History at 5 p.m. Thursday, April 21, in Bloch Learning and Performance Hall, 200A Creative Arts Center. He will discuss “Donatello and the Human Experience.”

Wilkins’ many publications range from articles and monographs on the Florentine Renaissance to introductory textbooks on the history of world art. A passionately committed teacher and mentor, Dr. Wilkins has won top prizes for his teaching from both the University of Pittsburgh and the College Art Association.

His publications include “The Collins Big Book of Art,” the revised sixth edition of “Art Past/Art Present,” with co-authors J. Bernard Schultz and Katheryn Linduff, the Seventh Edition of “History of Italian Renaissance Art,” and “Donatello” with Bonnie A. Bennett.

Wilkins received the National Award for Distinguished Teaching of Art History from the College Art Association in 2005 and the Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award at the University of Pittsburgh in 1987.

The J. Bernard Schultz Lecture Series in Art History was endowed in the College of Creative Arts in 2004 by donors who wish to remain anonymous. The Lecture Series honors former College of Creative Arts Dean Bernie Schultz, who is also professor of art history in the School of Art and Design.

Each year, the lecture series brings a leading art historian to WVU, to enhance the art history program, as well as engage the intellectual life of the University.