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The Art Museum of West Virginia University has announced new hours for the summer of 2016.

Effective now through mid-August, the summer hours are Thursday through Saturday, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m., with extended hours on Thursdays until 7:30 p.m.

According to Director Joyce Ice, the museum will still be available for school and other group tours by appointment throughout the summer. Admission is free.

In addition, there will several special events, including walk-in tours at different times during the summer and a Family and Community Day on Saturday, July 30, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

“This special day will celebrate our new exhibition that opened in the lower gallery on April 15, titled ‘Independent Vision: Self-Taught Artists from Appalachia,’” she said. “Minnie Adkins, one of the self-taught artists, will be visiting from Kentucky to give wood carving demonstrations, and there will be food, music, art projects for both children and adults, and the public will have the opportunity to view all the works in both galleries.”

“Independent Vision: Self-Taught Artists from Appalachia,” located in the John and Ruth McGee Gallery on the first floor, features approximately 100 pieces of art from the Ramona Love Lampell and Millard Lampell Collection.

The artists are sculptors, painters, wood carvers and basket makers who have drawn upon their life experiences, knowledge of the natural environment, and readily available materials, such as wood, clay, stone, house paint and found objects, to create their art.

Prints in the Deem Print Gallery, also on the first floor, were recently changed and include works by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton, James MacNeill Whistler, Elizabeth Murray, Nancy Graves, John Sloan, George Bellows, Caroline Armington, Will Peterson, Reginald Marsh and many others.

The upper gallery features contemporary art from the museum’s opening exhibition, “Visual Conversations: Looking and Listening,” including an entire section of works by Morgantown area native Blanche Lazzell.

The Art Museum is located near the Creative Arts Center, at the corner of Patteson Drive and Morrill Way at the Evansdale Campus North Entrance.

Parking is available in two new short-term lots with pay stations, one located near Patteson Drive and the other near the new Evansdale Crossing building.

For more information about the museum, call (304) 293-7790 or see the website at http://artmuseum.wvu.edu.

Surroundings Exhibit

The Mountain State provided inspiration for a new exhibition at West Virginia University. Twelve MFA candidates and recent graduates from WVU’s School of Art and Design are presenting a summer exhibition at the Creative Art Center’s Laura Mesaros Gallery, now through Aug. 18.

Titled “Surroundings: MFA Students Respond to Their Environments,” the exhibit features authentic contemporary experiences the students have had in West Virginia. The artists, who are from inside and outside the state, reflected on their surroundings to create this diverse work expressing personal, industrial, surreal and jovial perspectives.

“Glimpses of their personal studio surroundings are displayed with their works, and items from their studios are also included in this collaborative installation to surround visitors with a hint of their creative spaces,” said Sally Deskins, curator of the exhibition.

Deskins said viewers are invited to participate in the exhibition by posting a picture of their own surroundings (a selfie with the art in the gallery, or from around campus or their own West Virginia environments) with the hashtag #wvsurroundings. The photos will be printed weekly and displayed in the collaborative installation throughout the summer.

Surroundings exhibit in Mesaros Galleries

A closing reception for the exhibition is scheduled for Aug. 18, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the gallery, with a curator’s talk with artists at 5 p.m.

Deskins is a recent graduate of the School of Art and Design, having received her Master of Arts degree in Art History in 2016.

The artists in the exhibition include:

  • Allison Blair; White Plains, New York; printmaking
  • Nate Ditzler; Oahu, Hawaii; ceramics and sculpture
  • Tiera Floyd; Sutton, West Virginia; painting
  • Megan Gainer; Spencer, West Virginia; sculpture
  • Jake Guzan; Spring Grove, Illinois; printmaking
  • Brett Herron; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; printmaking and sculpture
  • Andrew Kellner; Toronto, Canada; ceramics
  • Ken Lu; Singapore; ceramics
  • Tessa Lee Martinez; Laredo, Texas; ceramics
  • Kaitlyn Hunter; Lisbon Falls, Maine; sculpture
  • Michael Oliver; Frederick, Maryland; photography
  • George Jae-Hyun Cho; Seoul, South Korea; ceramics

All Mesaros Galleries events, including art lectures, exhibitions and receptions are free and open to the public.

The summer exhibit, “Surroundings: MFA Students Respond to Their Environments,” may be viewed by appointment Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., with the curator, Sally Deskins, by contacting the WVU School of Art and Design at 304-293-4077 or stopping by the Art and Design office in Room 419A of the Creative Arts Center.

For more information, contact Sally Deskins at sbdeskins@mix.wvu.edu, or phone (304) 692-2176.

Arts academy launches at WVU

David | May 25, 2016
Visual Arts Summer Academy poster Budding artists can enjoy a packed week of workshops while getting a glimpse of life at West Virginia University. WVU’s School of Art and Design will debut its Visual Arts Summer Academy scheduled on the Evansdale campus July 17-23.

“Students will learn from WVU faculty and art teachers from around the state, while living in residence halls under the supervision of art education students and faculty,” said Terese Giobbia, assistant professor and coordinator of art education at WVU. The academy is open to all students in grades 6 through 12.

Each day of the academy will feature two workshop sessions, along with excursions around WVU’s campus. Daily afternoon enrichment sessions will be led by WVU faculty, and School of Art and Design educators will also lead evening sessions featuring lectures and studio explorations of their individual disciplines. The academy will conclude with an exhibition of student work.

“The Visual Arts Summer Academy is a community based-program that helps students hone their skills and think about careers in art and design,” said Giobbia.

Cost for the weeklong academy is $575. For information or to request registration forms, contact Giobbia at tegiobbia@mail.wvu.edu or 304-293-2393.

Jennifer Jordan Jennifer Jordan will join the West Virginia University College of Creative Arts as its director of development in June.

“We’re extremely excited to welcome Jennifer to the Creative Arts Center family,” said Dean Paul Kreider. “We know her experience will be a tremendous asset to the College of Creative Arts as we work to fund the expansion of the Creative Arts Center.”

In addition to the ambitious expansion project, Jordan will also concentrate on guiding and developing fundraising strategies for the Art Museum of WVU, student scholarships and assistantships, and a range of other initiatives.

“I look forward to working alongside Jennifer in furthering the goals of the College,” Kreider said.

“I am very excited about the opportunity to lead the fundraising efforts at the College of Creative Arts,” Jordan said. “I believe whole-heartedly in the land-grant mission of this University and our responsibility to serve West Virginia and her people – and serve I will. I anticipate great, visionary and bold things to come in the near future at the Creative Arts Center, so stay tuned!”

Jordan joins the College after a three-year stint as associate director of development for WVU’s College of Law. In that role, she worked closely with the dean to raise funds to support the mission, programs, project and students of the College. She managed a portfolio of major gift donors and prospects, along with the College’s annual giving program.

Prior to that, Jordan served as director of development for Legal Aid of West Virginia, where her statewide responsibilities involved implementing a comprehensive, effective resource development plan including major gifts, annual fund campaign management, grant research, and planned giving.

Her other professional experiences include work as a program director for West Virginia State University Extension, developing resources to aid in the revitalized of a gentrified community in Charleston. She’s been executive director for Kanawha Valley Collective, Inc., and senior program manager for Terrell Ellis & Associates, a management and consulting firm.

She earned a B.A. in History and Government from the WVU Institute of Technology and a M.A in American Public Policy and Political Science from WVU.

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Art has long been a component of diplomacy, allowing nations to promote their culture abroad. A West Virginia University faculty member will be a part of that grand tradition.

Amy Schissel teaches painting in WVU’s School of Art and Design. Two of her paintings have been selected by Canadian Foreign Affairs to hang in Canada’s embassy in Brussels.

“The Foreign Affairs Fine Art Collection contains Canadian work for use in embassies and official residences abroad,” Schissel explained. The collection is selected by a jury.

“When I was in graduate school at the University of Ottowa, I had a colleague working as an intern at Foreign Affairs who suggested my work be considered,” she said.

One of the directors of the collection had seen Schissel’s exhibitions in Ottowa, Toronto, and Montreal. “My work was selected to undergo a juried process to select works for the Canadian Embassy in Brussels,” she said.

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“I’m so proud to have Amy on our faculty,” said Alison Helm, director of the School of Art & Design. “She brings a vibrant inspirational enthusiasm for our students and serves as an excellent role model for them. The experience of exhibiting internationally brings a unique set of experiences to our students.”

Schissel’s works are acrylic on canvas, which she describes as “imaginative reinventions of our contemporary landscape. They envision otherwise invisible internet connectivities and telecommunications, showing new cartographies for a digital era.”

A recurring theme in Schissel’s current work is the contemporary state of painting and drawing in the age of digital image making.

“I examine how abstract painting and drawing can be coaxed out of being ‘old media’ with the application of digital and electronic language to the painterly field,” she said.

Schissel’s work is also included in “Here to There,” an ongoing exhibition featuring work by School of Art and Design faculty members at the Huntington Museum of Art. “Here to There” runs through June 12.

She’s also been commissioned to create a painting to hang in WVU’s Evansdale Library.

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All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For more information about ticketed events, call 304.293.SHOW. For information about any College of Creative Arts events, call the Publicity Office at 304.293.3397. Events on this calendar are subject to change. For the latest information, see our web calendar at http://ccarts.wvu.edu.

All College of Creative Arts programs, services, and activities are accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations, call 304.293.4171.

Friday, May 13
COMMENCEMENT: WVU College of Creative Arts
The WVU College of Creative Arts will celebrate its graduating undergraduate and graduate students at its commencement ceremony at 4 p.m. Friday, May 13, in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre of the Creative Arts Center. Eric Ting, who earned a BFA in Theatre in 1997, will serve as speaker, and an honorary DMA will be conferred upon Charlie McCoy.

Through Saturday, May 14
EXHIBITION: Bachelor of Fine Arts Show
Seniors graduating with a bachelor of fine arts degree in the WVU College of Creative Arts will exhibit their final projects in the Creative Arts Center’s Mesaros Galleries, April 14 through May 14. The Mesaros Galleries will be open during the College of Creative Arts Commencement ceremony, to be held Friday, May 13, at 4 p.m. in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre of the Creative Arts Center.

Through June 12
EXHIBITION: “Here to There”
Huntington area art lovers will get a chance to enjoy works by West Virginia University faculty members in an ongoing exhibition. “Here to There: An Exhibition of Work by WVU School of Art & Design Faculty” is on view at the Huntington Museum of Art through June 12.

Mark your calendars:

Ongoing

ART MUSEUM OF WVU: Exhibitions: Visual Conversations: Looking and Listening and Independent Vision: Self-Taught Artists from Appalachia
The Art Museum of WVU will be closed Saturday, May 7, to Wednesday, May 11. It will be open to the public for walk-in tours at 2 p.m. Thursday, May 12. It will be closed except to scheduled school groups Friday, May 13, to Tuesday, May 17. It will be open for public walk-in tours at 2 p.m. Wednesday, May 18 (International Museum Day). Summer hours begin Thursday, May 19. The museum will be open from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, with extended hours on Thursdays until 7:30 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, visit http://artmuseum.wvu.edu.

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
This year, West Virginia University will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Visit http://artsandhumanities.wvu.edu for more information and a calendar of events.

New World Ensemble rehearsal

All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For more information about ticketed events, call 304.293.SHOW. For information about any College of Creative Arts events, call the Publicity Office at 304.293.3397. Events on this calendar are subject to change. For the latest information, see our web calendar at http://ccarts.wvu.edu.

All College of Creative Arts programs, services, and activities are accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations, call 304.293.4171.

Saturday, May 7
CONCERT: New World Ensemble
A new musical theatre ensemble at West Virginia University will end its first year with a spring concert at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 7, in the Gladys G. Davis Theatre of the Creative Arts Center. The New World Ensemble will perform pieces of Jason Robert Brown’s “Songs for a New World,” Stephen Sondheim’s “Sunday in the Park with George,” and Adam Guettel’s “Light in the Piazza,” among others. The concert is free and open to the public.

Through Saturday, May 14
EXHIBITION: Bachelor of Fine Arts Show
Seniors graduating with a bachelor of fine arts degree in the WVU College of Creative Arts will exhibit their final projects in the Creative Arts Center’s Mesaros Galleries, April 14 through May 14. The Mesaros Galleries will be open during the College of Creative Arts Commencement ceremony, to be held Friday, May 13, at 4 p.m. in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre of the Creative Arts Center.

Through June 12
EXHIBITION: “Here to There”
Huntington area art lovers will get a chance to enjoy works by West Virginia University faculty members in an ongoing exhibition. “Here to There: An Exhibition of Work by WVU School of Art & Design Faculty” is on view at the Huntington Museum of Art through June 12.

Mark your calendars:

Ongoing

ART MUSEUM OF WVU: Exhibitions: Visual Conversations: Looking and Listening and Independent Vision: Self-Taught Artists from Appalachia
The Art Museum of WVU is open to the public Wednesday through Sunday, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. For more information, visit http://artmuseum.wvu.edu.

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
This year, West Virginia University will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Visit http://artsandhumanities.wvu.edu for more information and a calendar of events.

Get into mini-comics this summer

David | April 28, 2016
Intro to Mini Comics

Joe Lupo, associate professor and coordinator of printmaking in WVU’s School of Art and Design, will offer his popular Intro to Mini-Comics course, Art 493A, from May 16 to June 3.

“In this course, we both research the history of 20th Century independent American comics and learn about strategies to make our own mini-comics,” said Lupo.

Students read well-known comics like “Maus” and “Persepolis” that deal with autobiographic subject matter, along with books like “The Comic Book History of Conics” and “Understanding Comics” that delve into the history and creation of comics.

The class also makes their own comics, though no prior skills are needed to take this class.

“We will investigate all kinds of methods to create imagery and text, so students can use the style and approach that best fits them,” Lupo said. Students will make daily autobiographical comics and six non-fiction mini comics throughout the three-week course.

At the end of the course, the class will publish a collaborative comic titled “Yard Sale,” which is annually printed and distributed at regional comic shops like Copacetic Comics in Pittsburgh.

For more information, contact Lupo at 304-293-2703 or Joseph.Lupo@mail.wvu.edu.

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Students in West Virginia University’s ceramics program have taken technology into their own hands, creating a 3D printer with the help of another 3D printer.

The project came together with help from Bryan Czibesz, a professor at SUNY New Paltz.

“Bryan redesigned a Delta DC ceramic extrusion printer by Jonathan Keep that he found on line on an open source site called Thingverse,” said Kelly O’Briant, a post-doctoral fellow in WVU’s School of Art and Design. “He redesigned it to be larger, more durable, and easily made using a plastic printer, a computer numerical control CNC machine, and wood shop equipment.”

Here at WVU, ceramics students worked with Shanti Hamburg of the Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources create the wood parts for the base and top supports, learning to use a manual milling machine and CNC router.

“We ended up using the CNC router courtesy of David DeVallance in the School of Forestry and Natural Resources, and Benjamin Groover, manager of network services for the Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design.

“It was quite a process because this is the one machine we don’t have in ceramics,” said O’Briant. “But, it was great because students got to have the experience of networking with other departments, and now those folks are interested in what we are doing.”

With Czibesz’s files, the students printed the plastic parts in WVU’s production ceramics studio with MakerBots and MakerGear printers.

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“When Bryan arrived on Wednesday night, he looked over all of the inventory we’d collected,” O’Briant said. On Thursday morning, we all met at the studio and began assembly.” There were a core group of grads here for the duration and several students who came and went based on class schedules.

By the end of the day Thursday, they had both printers assembled and one printer printing. Students learned how to prepare the porcelain paste, how to control print speed and air pressure in order to control the printer, how to upload their own files and a little software information.

“On Friday, we had the second printer running by mid-day,” O’Briant continued. “Bryan said this group was a little different than many others he does workshops with because the students in this class now have substantial experience with 3D modeling software already.”

Since then, several students have printed on our new printers and they continue to be very excited about it.

“Bryan’s workshop helped the students to gain a concise introduction of the printer’s abilities and the possibilities on how to incorporate 3-D technology into our work by showing examples of his work and others who are working in similar methods,” said George Cho, a graduate student in WVU’s ceramics studio. “His expertise in printing with clay helped to clarify some technical issues and the material process involved in preparations for printing 3-D ceramic object.”

Cho notes that “through virtual design, artists are now able to create forms that were previously impossible to create by hand. As well as creating complex forms, artists can expand their visual language through incorporating 3-D printed pieces with their own work.”

“Each step of ceramic making requires a specialized understanding of materials and processes, and the delta printer is no exception,” said Brandon Schnur, a graduate student in WVU’s ceramics studio. “As a tactile artist, my excitement for hand building a machine that can enrich my ability to do what I already love may seem unexplainable to anyone who doesn’t hold the same kind of affinity for the process.”

While Schnur’s favorite tools will always be his own two hands, he’s intrigued by the potential of a 3D printer to supplement a ceramicist’s work.

“The machine is not here to make your work for you, but it is the equivalent of having a second pan in your kitchen,” Schnur said. “There is no magic pill that you can place into the microwave and receive a full meal, but you can make a much more efficient dinner when you aren’t limited to one pan.”

“Building a printer from the bottom up allows students to gain a deeper understanding of how the machine works and what it can do,” O’Briant said. “It links ceramics to the digital world in a very interesting way. These printers print clay! What more can you ask for from a 3D printer?”

Makers Challenge 2016

Two new student organizations at West Virginia University awarded prizes during the first-ever Mountaineer Maker’s Challenge on Friday, April 22.

The competition, sponsored by the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and student organizations Material Advantage and Materials Research Society, challenged students to create and print a unique 3D design that could be judged in one of four categories: best artistic design, best West Virginia pride, best mechanized design and open design.

The challenge of designing and printing a unique design wasn’t just for fun. According to Edward Sabolsky, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, the competition was created to bring visibility to the new materials science and engineering program in the Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources.

“Materials science and engineering involves the discovery and design of new materials, so maker’s challenges are often used to spark interest in the field,” said Sabolsky. “Because it’s a new program at WVU and is currently only offered at the masters and doctoral level, we thought a maker’s challenge would be a good way to introduce the program to our current undergraduate students.”

In total, 19 entries were received and voting was open to students, faculty and staff. Prizes were awarded in the following categories:

Best Artistic Design: first place – Bryan Jackson, mechanical engineering; second place – Brandon Schnur, ceramics third place – Ken Lu Yong Jion, ceramics

Best Mechanized Design: first place – Chris Guffey, ceramics, and Ken Lu Yong Jion

Best Mountaineer Pride: first place – Nathan Owen, general engineering; second place – Lee Chirpas, mechanical engineering; third place – Brandon Schnur

Open: first place – Andrew Kellner, ceramics; second place – Ken Lu Yong Jion; third place – George Cho, ceramics

The Statler College Dean’s Office and Office of Outreach and Recruitment also played a vital role in advertising the competition and providing prizes for the winners. Sabolsky and the student organizations involved have big plans for next year’s Mountaineer Maker’s Challenge, which they plan to host during the Statler College’s Engineers Week celebration in February.

“Our vision is to involve K-12 students and students from majors throughout WVU to interact, design and create,” said Sabolsky. “We want to use the Mountaineer Maker’s Challenge as a tool to celebrate engineering throughout West Virginia.”

—By Bernadette Dombrowski, Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources