Summer Youth Choral Academy

The WVU Summer Youth Choral Academy will help students develop the whole choral musician. The session will be offered from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 18-22, 2016.

“Consummate choral singers require sound vocal technique, an understanding of music theory, and skills in aural and sight-singing,” said Kym Scott, director of choral activities for WVU’s School of Music. “Over the five days spent at the Summer Youth Choral Academy, students focus on developing these skills, ensuring that they emerge as more versatile musicians.”

Sessions will take place at WVU’s Creative Arts Center in Morgantown, W.Va.

To ensure that students are prepared for a full day of music making, each morning will begin with a full-body warm-up, including breathing exercises, stretching, and vocal warm-ups. The techniques explored during the warm-up will carry through the day’s rehearsals where they will be practically integrated into all singing. In addition to warming up the voice and the body, time will be spent each day developing aural and sight-singing skills. Each day, students will also spend time learning exciting and varied choral repertoire. Students who have an interest in conducting will also have the opportunity to gain experience in this area.

“While the week will focus on developing the choral musician, no one can work all the time, it is summer after all,” Scott added. “There will be times each day to relax and socialize, and to make new friends.”

For more information or to register, contact Karen Taddie, coordinator of WVU’s Community Music Program, at 304-293-6946 or Karen.Taddie@mail.wvu.edu

Houde to teach at Interlochen

David | May 4, 2016
Andrea Priester Houde The term “summer camp” will take on a whole new meaning for Andrea Priester Houd when she takes up a post on the faculty at one of the nation’s premiere arts academies.

Houde, assistant professor of viola in the West Virginia University School of Music, will teach at the Interlochen Center for the Arts in Michigan this summer.

“This is one of, if not the most important pre-college summer arts institution in the country, with the finest pre-college musicians,’ Houde said. “Many of these students end up going to the top universities and conservatories in the United States.”

In fact, Interlochen has taught 43 Presidential Scholars, 17 percent of the musicians in the nation’s major orchestras, and 11 MacArthur Grant recipients. Its alumni have received 124 Grammy Awards and 26 Tony Awards.

This will be a return to Interlochen for Houde, who spent a summer there as a college student working as a practice supervisor.

She was taking a break from performing after an injury and had decided to spend the summer pursuing her other passion, teaching.

“Even back then, it was always on my wish list to come back as an official faculty member,” she said. “It’s such a dream to think that I will be on the faculty.”

Houde will be teaching viola and chamber music and performing with world-class colleagues. She’ll also join some familiar faces on the viola faculty.

“Several of the viola faculty are also my teachers, which is such an honor,” she said. Interlochen’s viola faculty include scholars from the Cleveland Institute of Music and performers who have played with the Metropolitan Opera and Cleveland Orchestra.

“This is exciting on so many levels, but maybe most important is the fact that I’ll get the chance to be an ambassador for WVU to all of these amazing young musicians, and to my fellow faculty,” Houde said. “I’m really looking forward to representing the School of Music to this elite group of artists.”

After her time in Interlochen in June and early July, Houde will finish out the summer at the Master Players Festival in Delaware, where she’ll play with some of the finest musicians from around the world.

With so much playing and teaching on the agenda for the summer, Houde suspects she’ll come back to Morgantown “invigorated and inspired.”

Keyboard_bg

A one-of-a-kind festival will return to West Virginia University when its School of Music hosts the fifth annual Keyboard Festival and Competitions June 3-5 at the Creative Arts Center.

Over the course of the three-day festival, some $11,000 in prizes will be awarded to college and high school pianists.

“To our knowledge there is no other such event anywhere that combines jazz and classical music with competitions for pianists in both categories,” said James Miltenberger, professor of piano at WVU.  

The two core competitions are the Christine Bane Kefferstan Classical Piano Competition and the James Milteberger Jazz Piano Competition. Pre-screenings for both must be received by May 13 in the form of a compact disc, online link, or MP3 file featuring two or more contrasting pieces for the classical competition, comprising of 15 minutes music time, or three selections (ballad, medium tempo, and up-tempo) for the jazz competition.

For registration details, please visit http://music.wvu.edu/summer-programs/keyboard-festival-and-competitions.

“This will be our fifth year and we are especially pleased with the guest artists coming who will be giving recitals and judging the finals of the competitions,” said Miltenberger.

This year’s guest artists are Jerome Lowenthal and Dan Haerle.

Lowenthal has taught piano and chamber music at the Julliard School in New York since 1994. He’s won prizes in competitions in Brussels, Bolzano, and Darmstadt, and performed with major orchestras, including Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, New York, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, and San Francisco. His extensive recording catalog emphasizes solo concertos and chamber music.

Haerle recently retired after 25 years as a faculty member in jazz studies in the University of North Texas College of Music. He taught jazz piano, jazz fundamentals, advanced improvisation, and supervised the jazz chamber music program. He’s authored several jazz textbooks, is an active jazz clinician nationally and internationally, and was inducted into the International Association Association of Jazz Education Hall of Fame in 2003.

General and NWE

A new musical theatre ensemble at West Virginia University will end its first year with a spring concert at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 7, in the Gladys G. Davis Theatre of the Creative Arts Center.

The New World Ensemble will perform pieces of Jason Robert Brown’s “Songs for a New World,” Stephen Sondheim’s “Sunday in the Park with George,” and Adam Guettel’s “Light in the Piazza,” among others. The concert is free and open to the public.

General McArthur Hambrick, assistant professor of dance in WVU’s School of Theatre and Dance, started the group in the fall semester of 2015 as “a means to give musical theatre students an outlet to perform and hone their crafts, as well as to create a small, self-contained group that can perform at special events on and off campus, acting as ambassadors for the program, the College of Creative Arts, and WVU,” Hambrick said.

The mission of the group is twofold: “preparing students for a professional performance career and educating young and old audiences in the musical theatre repertoire, bringing entertainment to parts of West Virginia that might not see it otherwise,” Hambrick said.

Members of the ensemble have additional opportunities to develop performance skills, hone their sight reading, and become more aware of the wide range of musical theatre. Students work their way to becoming “triple threats,” adept actors, singers and dancers, while building an ensemble with their peers.

Students in the ensemble include Marissa Bailey, Kayla Banks, Alex Brown, Patrick Clarke, Katherine Conklin, Jordan Crow, Michaela Edens, Deja Elliott, Taylor Heath, Haley Hizer, Casey Johnson, Hannah Kitchen, Ashley Koon, Hunter Nolan, Elizabeth Schiffbauer, Lindsay Wayne, and accompanist Julia Kindernect.

New World Ensemble rehearsal

All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For more information about ticketed events, call 304.293.SHOW. For information about any College of Creative Arts events, call the Publicity Office at 304.293.3397. Events on this calendar are subject to change. For the latest information, see our web calendar at http://ccarts.wvu.edu.

All College of Creative Arts programs, services, and activities are accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations, call 304.293.4171.

Saturday, May 7
CONCERT: New World Ensemble
A new musical theatre ensemble at West Virginia University will end its first year with a spring concert at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 7, in the Gladys G. Davis Theatre of the Creative Arts Center. The New World Ensemble will perform pieces of Jason Robert Brown’s “Songs for a New World,” Stephen Sondheim’s “Sunday in the Park with George,” and Adam Guettel’s “Light in the Piazza,” among others. The concert is free and open to the public.

Through Saturday, May 14
EXHIBITION: Bachelor of Fine Arts Show
Seniors graduating with a bachelor of fine arts degree in the WVU College of Creative Arts will exhibit their final projects in the Creative Arts Center’s Mesaros Galleries, April 14 through May 14. The Mesaros Galleries will be open during the College of Creative Arts Commencement ceremony, to be held Friday, May 13, at 4 p.m. in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre of the Creative Arts Center.

Through June 12
EXHIBITION: “Here to There”
Huntington area art lovers will get a chance to enjoy works by West Virginia University faculty members in an ongoing exhibition. “Here to There: An Exhibition of Work by WVU School of Art & Design Faculty” is on view at the Huntington Museum of Art through June 12.

Mark your calendars:

Ongoing

ART MUSEUM OF WVU: Exhibitions: Visual Conversations: Looking and Listening and Independent Vision: Self-Taught Artists from Appalachia
The Art Museum of WVU is open to the public Wednesday through Sunday, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. For more information, visit http://artmuseum.wvu.edu.

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
This year, West Virginia University will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Visit http://artsandhumanities.wvu.edu for more information and a calendar of events.

hendricks_award

John Hendricks, West Virginia University’s Director of Bands, thought his final concert as director of the Wind Symphony was going to be emotional. A surprise announcement made the event even more memorable.

That night, on the stage of the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre in the Creative Arts Center, Hendricks learned that he’d received the A. Frank Martin Award from Kappa Kappa Psi National Honorary Band Fraternity.

After intermission, Marie Burleigh, an employee of WVU Extension and the Northeast District Governor of Kappa Kappa Psi, took the stage to surprise Hendricks.

“I’m delighted to be making tonight’s presentation, as I’ve known our honoree since he was a freshman in the Pride of West Virginia,” Burleigh said.

Since then, Hendricks has served as WVU’s Associate Director of Bands, Director of the Mountaineer Marching Band, conductor of the Symphonic Band, assistant chair for the School of Music, Director of Bands, and assistant dean for the College of Creative Arts.

“When he took over the Mountaineer Marching Band from Don Wilcox, he was taking on an extraordinary challenge,” Burleigh said. “Fans have very strong feelings about The Pride, and they tend to dislike change. But when anyone expressed concern to me, my response was, ‘He’s got this. He came up through this program so he understands this band, and he saw what happened when Mr. Wilcox took “Simple Gifts” out of pre-game. He’s got this!’ And, of course, he did.”

Hendricks, who is stepping down from his position as Director of Bands for a new administrative assignment in the College, is “humbled at receiving the A. Frank Martin Award from the National Council of Kappa Kappa Psi.  It is an honor to receive such a prestigious award – especially at this final concert.  It made this special evening even more bittersweet.”

The A. Frank Martin award recognizes those individuals who have made significant contributions to the band field, whether laymen or band directors, in their region. The award shows gratitude for their service to music with the same love that recipients of this award have shown towards their local bands.

Martin was the first Grand National President of Kappa Kappa Psi, serving from 1919 to 1921. A saxophone player in the band at Oklahoma A&M College – now Oklahoma State University – he was a charter member of the Alpha Chapter. In 1939, he began 25 years of service as the third National Executive Secretary. For many years, the national headquarters of the Fraternity was operated from Martin’s attic, until office space was acquired on the Oklahoma State campus. He was also instrumental in the founding of Tau Beta Sigma National Honorary Sorority in 1946.

Hendricks was nominated for the award by the Omicron Chapter of Kappa Kappa Psi, which has been supporting WVU bands for 90 years.

You can see the April 19 concert and the presentation on the WVU College of Creative Arts Live Streaming channel on YouTube, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7B7oWbSvRo&feature=youtu.be.

Music major accepted to Oxford

David | April 26, 2016
Joseph Rabchuk If you had asked Joey Rabchuk what he wanted to be before enrolling in college, he would have answered, “a doctor.” But a love of music persisted and evolved over four years at West Virginia University, and he’ll take that love to one of the greatest universities in the world, the University of Oxford.

Rabchuk, who will graduate in May with a Bachelor of Arts in Music, had been fairly set on a career in medicine, though he had been active in orchestra through his high school years in Macomb, Ill. When a family friend encouraged him to consider WVU’s College of Creative Arts, he gave the school a shot. (That family friend happened to be Paul Kreider, dean of the College, which may have given the recommendation some extra weight.)

“I came out here to audition and have a trial violin lesson with Professor Mikylah McTeer, and I loved it,” he said. “She’s a fantastic player, teacher, and is an incredibly warm person.”

It was a hard decision, but in the end, the chance to work with McTeer, the opportunity for a tuition waiver, and a flexible academic program that would allow him to pursue both music and pre-med led him to become a Mountaineer.

Of course, part of a university education is being exposed to new topics and ideas, and those experiences led Rabchuk in a new direction.

“Musicology became really interesting to me when I started to realize how broad the field is,” he said. “I think the stereotypical conception of musicology is that it’s kind of dry, and generally irrelevant to the everyday experiences of most people. But that’s completely untrue.”

Rabchuk finds the field “incredibly lively, and there are so many perspectives from which you can analyze music. Two people who helped him explore those perspectives were Travis Stimeling and Evan MacCarthy, both assistant professors of musicology in WVU’s School of Music.

“Dr. Stimeling took an approach to the survey classes that emphasized how music stood in relation to its culture of origin and how colonialism and things like that affected it, which I really liked,” Rabchuk said. “Also, his first lecture at WVU, which he gave while applying for the job here, was about Taylor Swift and gender in music. That was awesome. The opportunity to work with Dr. MacCarthy has been just as inspiring.”

“Joey is an inquisitive and thoughtful student and, using the liberal arts foundation that the Bachelor of Arts in Music offers, he has crafted an impressive variety of experiences that will serve him well in our field,” said Stimeling, who gave Rabchuk the opportunity to work on his project researching West Virginia songwriters. “I’m eager to watch him flourish as he continues his studies and begins to enter the profession.”

“Since meeting Joey for the first time last fall, I’ve been impressed by the enthusiastic curiosity that he brings to all aspects of musical study, quickly drawing on reading and methodologies from other disciplines to inform his research,” said MacCarthy.

His minors in anthropology and philosophy have helped him forge other intellectual connections, and they helped him decide to pursue graduate school.

“When I was searching for programs, my mom sort of jokingly suggested Oxford, but I didn’t look seriously at their program until this past winter break,” he said. “Dr. MacCarthy suggested I look at schools in the United Kingdom since their admission deadlines are usually later in the academic year.”

“Graduate study in the U.K. is often structured around a different academic model than the one we have here in the United States, including the tutorial-based system of teaching as well as shorter term lengths that can allow additional time for independent research,” MacCarthy said. “Joey strikes me as someone who would thrive in this model of study.”

Research into Oxford’s musicology program led him to discover faculty members who share his scholarly interests, and, with Stimeling and MacCarthy’s encouragement, he applied.

“Getting the letter of acceptance felt strange,” he said. “I remember when I first saw the email that I was shaking a little bit. It was really shocking. There was no chance in my mind that I would actually be accepted, so it was a gigantic, more-than-welcome surprise.”

Rabchuk will celebrate that surprise – and his journey from potential MD to future Doctor of Musicology – at the WVU College of Creative Arts Commencement at 4 p.m. Friday, May 13, in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre of the Creative Arts Center.

Spring Dance Showcase 2016

All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For more information about ticketed events, call 304.293.SHOW. For information about any College of Creative Arts events, call the Publicity Office at 304.293.3397. Events on this calendar are subject to change. For the latest information, see our web calendar at http://ccarts.wvu.edu.

All College of Creative Arts programs, services, and activities are accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations, call 304.293.4171.

Monday, April 25
WORKSHOP: The Bennett House
Two dozen students from West Virginia University’s School of Theatre and Dance will get the opportunity to help shepherd “Pride and Prejudice” to Broadway. The students will participate in a workshop production – of “The Bennett House” at 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 25, in the Vivian Davis Michael Theatre of the Creative Arts Center. “The Bennett House” is a new musical loosely based on Jane Austen’s beloved comedy of manners. The workshop is free and open to the public. Seating in the Vivian Davis Michael Theatre is limited, so audience members should plan to arrive early.

Tuesday, April 26
ART UP CLOSE: Shoji Satake
What does an Iznik pottery plate made in Asia Minor during the 17th century have in common with a plate made by a Chinese artist in 1999? How are they different? What materials and techniques did the artists use? These two works from the WVU Art Collection will be the subject of the Art Museum of WVU’s next Art Up Close event, to be held at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 26. Shoji Satake, who is coordinator of the Ceramics Program in the WVU School of Art and Design, will compare and contrast the ceramic plate from 17th century Anatolia with a contemporary plate created by artist Yu Yong in 1999.

CONCERT: Chamber Winds
Chamber Winds ensemble will conclude their 2015-16 concert season at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 26, in the Gladys G. Davis Theatre of the Creative Arts Center. The concert is free and open to the public. John Weigand, professor of clarinet and director of the ensemble, will lead the woodwind ensemble in works by Carl Reinecke, Andre Caplet, and Antonin Dvořák.

Wednesday, April 27
LUNCHTIME LOOK: Diego Rivera
Art Museum of WVU docent Art Jacknowitz will discuss a watercolor by Mexican artist Diego Rivera during the next Lunchtime Looks program on Wednesday, April 27. WVU students, faculty and staff, and the general public are invited to bring a brown bag lunch to the Museum Education Center Grand Hall at noon and meet with other art enthusiasts to enjoy their midday meal. At 12:30 p.m., the group will move to the Museum Classroom on the ground floor for a 20-minute, in-depth look at Rivera’s watercolor on rice paper.

SCREENING: Tough Love
A pair of School of Theatre & Dance alumni have taken success into their own hands, and they’re coming back to share their experiences in creating original content and the brave new world of digital distribution with students at their alma mater. They’ll screen all 6 episodes – of Season Three of “Tough Love” and host a question-and-answer session about creating original content and the wide range of new distribution channels at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 27, in the Gladys G. Davis Theatre of the Creative Arts Center.

Thursday, April 28, and Friday, April 29
CONCERT: Spring Dance Showcase
Dance students have been building their Spring Dance Showcase from the ground up. The concerts will be held at 7 and 9 p.m. Thursday, April 28, and 7 and 9 p.m. Friday, April 29, in the Edna Falbo Theatre in WVU’s Creative Arts Center. For tickets and information, please contact the WVU Box Office at 304-293-SHOW.

Friday, April 29, through Sunday, May 1
LAB Theatre: There’s a Darkness Around Me That’s Flooded in Light
WVU’s LAB Theatre program will present a stage reading of School of Theatre and Dance student Woody Pond’s play, which, according to Pond, “tells the story of three swordsmen sitting on a couch, boozing and reminiscing as they attempt to pass the first stage of their final test – solving a SUPER HARD riddle.” Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday in the SLAB Theatre, 239A Creative Arts Center. Admission is free, but seating is limited, so audiences should arrive early.

Through Saturday, May 14
EXHIBITION: Bachelor of Fine Arts Show
Seniors graduating with a bachelor of fine arts degree in the WVU College of Creative Arts will exhibit their final projects in the Creative Arts Center’s Mesaros Galleries, April 14 through May 14. The Mesaros Galleries will be open during the College of Creative Arts Commencement ceremony, to be held Friday, May 13, at 4 p.m. in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre of the Creative Arts Center.

Through June 12
EXHIBITION: “Here to There”
Huntington area art lovers will get a chance to enjoy works by West Virginia University faculty members in an ongoing exhibition. “Here to There: An Exhibition of Work by WVU School of Art & Design Faculty” is on view at the Huntington Museum of Art through June 12.

Mark your calendars:

Ongoing

ART MUSEUM OF WVU: Exhibitions: Visual Conversations: Looking and Listening and Independent Vision: Self-Taught Artists from Appalachia
The Art Museum of WVU is open to the public Wednesday through Sunday, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. For more information, visit http://artmuseum.wvu.edu.

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
This year, West Virginia University will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Visit http://artsandhumanities.wvu.edu for more information and a calendar of events.

Chamber Winds 2016

West Virginia University’s Chamber Winds ensemble will conclude their 2015-16 concert season at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 26, in the Gladys G. Davis Theatre of the Creative Arts Center. The concert is free and open to the public.

John Weigand, professor of clarinet and director of the ensemble, will lead the woodwind ensemble in works by Carl Reinecke, Andre Caplet, and Antonin Dvořák.

The concert begins with Reinecke’s four-movement Octet, Opus 16. Hamburg-born Reinecke began to compose at the age of seven, and made his debut as a pianist at 12. He spent much of his career as director of the Gewandhaus Orchestra in Leipzig and a professor of composition and piano.

Next on the program is Caplet’s Suite Persane. This suite was composed in 1900, during the time that the music movement in Paris was seeking inspiration from external music traditions in the orient, middle east and Africa.

The evening concludes with Dvořák’s Czech Suite. Originally written for a small chamber orchestra, it was composed as the first set of the Slavonic Dances. Each of the five movements are based on dances.

Featuring students from WVU’s School of Music, the ensemble puts woodwinds in the spotlight. The Chamber Winds line-up includes flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, and horn.

Cindy Anderson Cynthia Anderson, professor of oboe and director of graduate studies in West Virginia University’s School of Music, will celebrate “Music from the British Isles” in her upcoming faculty recital at 1 p.m. Sunday, April 24, in Bloch Learning and Performance Hall, 200A Creative Arts Center.

The recital will begin with Richard Rodney Bennett’s “After Syrinx.” Bennett expressed a particular affection for the works of Debussy, and this is the first of three works by him based upon Debussy’s Syrinx for solo flute.

Anderson will then perform Ralph Vaughan Williams’ “Six Studies in Enlish Folk-Song,” adapted for English horn by Robert Stanton. Originally for cello and piano, this transcription for English horn is perfectly suited to communicate the soulful nature of the melodies, miniature compositional excursions on English folk songs.

The recital continues with Alan Bush’s “Northumbrian Impressions,” which Anderson describes as a charming if lesser-known piece in the oboe repertoire, that still offers a “technical and expressive tour de force.”

The final piece of the recital will be Henri Brod’s Fantasie Op 57 after the “Mad Scene” from Lucia di Lammermoor, which uses themes from one of the most famous coloratura soprano arias in the operatic literature.

Anderson will be joined in the recital by pianist Marina Schmidt Lupinacci. The recital is free and open to the public.