We're Morgantown's best!

David | February 10, 2016
Oscars

Thanks so much to the readers of Morgantown Magazine for recognizing us in the Best of Morgantown Awards for 2016!

We’re proud that the Creative Arts Center was named Best Theater, and that the Art Museum of WVU was named Best Museum/Gallery!

This Week @ the CAC: Feb. 8-14, 2016

David | February 8, 2016
Oscars

All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For more information about ticketed events, call 304.293.SHOW. For information about any College of Creative Arts events, call the Publicity Office at 304.293.3397. Events on this calendar are subject to change. For the latest information, see our web calendar at http://ccarts.wvu.edu.

All College of Creative Arts programs, services, and activities are accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations, call 304.293.4171.

Monday, Feb. 8
MASTERCLASSES: With the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
Gifted musicians from the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra (PSO) will share their expertise with students from the WVU School of Music in three masterclasses scheduled for Monday, Feb. 8. Lorna McGhee, principal flutist, will lead a masterclass for the flute studio from 1 to 3 p.m. in 424A Creative Arts Center. Gretchen Van Hoesen, principal harpist and Virginia Campbell Chair, will lead four WVU harpists in a masterclass at 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. in 215A Creative Arts Center. First Violin and Nancy and Jeffrey Leininger Violinist Christopher Wu will lead four WVU violinists in a masterclass at 5 to 7 p.m. in Bloch Learning and Performance Hall, 200A Creative Arts Center. The masterclasses are free and open to the public.

CONCERT: WVU Jazz Ensembles
West Virginia University’s talented jazz musicians will present an eclectic concert at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 8, in the Gladys Davis Theatre of the Creative Arts Center. For tickets and information, call the WVU Box Office at 304-293-SHOW.

CONCERT: “Ultimate Oscars” with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
The Oscar celebration starts early this year with The Ultimate Oscars – at the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theater at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 8. Former Resident Conductor Lawrence Loh returns to celebrate the last 50 years of Oscar-winning scores with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. From John Williams to John Barry, audiences will enjoy unforgettable music from films like “Lord of the Rings,” “Schindler’s List,” “The Godfather,” “Star Wars” and more! For tickets and information, call the WVU Box Office 304-293-SHOW.

Tuesday, Feb. 9
ART UP CLOSE! Shoji Satake
Two works from the WVU Art Collection will be the subject of the Art Museum of WVU’s next Art Up Close! event, to be held Tuesday, Feb. 9. Shoji Satake, who is coordinator of the Ceramics Program in the School of Art & Design, will compare and contrast a ceramic plate from 17th century Anatolia with a contemporary plate created by artist Yu Yong in 1999. Titled “La Maladie de Porcelaine: Porcelain Sickness,” his presentation begins at 5:30 p.m. in the Museum Education Center Grand Hall and will be followed by a question-and-answer session and light refreshments. Those attending will also be able to view the two ceramic works up close. The event is free and open to the public.

Thursday, Feb. 11
VISITING ARTIST LECTURE: Ryan Clifford
A graphic arts and educator with an interest in social change will deliver the next visiting artist lecture for West Virginia University’s School of Art & Design. Ryan Clifford will speak at 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 11, in Bloch Learning and Performance Hall, 200A Creative Arts Center. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Friday, Feb. 12
CONCERT: WVU Wind Symphony
The members of the West Virginia University Wind Symphony will grow as artists under the batons of three guest conductors at their 7:30 p.m. concert on Friday, Feb. 12, in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre at the Creative Arts Center. The concert is part of WVU’s annual High School Honor Bands Event and will feature guest conductors who will also work with the high-school students. For tickets and information, please call the WVU Box Office at 304-293-SHOW.

Friday, Feb. 12-Sunday, Feb. 14
PLAY: “Disgraced” by Ayad Akhtar
WVU’s LAB Theatre program will present Ayad Akhtar’s “Disgraced,” an exploration of Islamophobia and Muslim-American identity, at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Feb. 12 and 13, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 14, in the Vivian Davis Michael Laboratory Theatre in the Creative Arts Center. The play, staged and performed by students in the School of Theatre & Dance, focuses on a dinner party for four people of very different backgrounds, where heated discussion of politics and religion make for a powder keg of identity issues. LAB Theatre productions are free and open to the public, but seating is limited.

Saturday, Feb. 13
CONCERT: High School Honor Band
WVU will host its 37th Annual Invitational High School Honor Bands event on Feb. 11-13 at the Creative Arts Center. Approximately 375 student musicians, representing almost 100 high schools in West Virginia and five regional states, will participate. They are recommended by their high school band directors and selected on the basis of their ability and accomplishments. The students will audition for band placement Thursday evening and then rehearse for two days before presenting the annual Honor Bands Concert at 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 13, in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre at the Creative Arts Center. The concert is free and open to the public.

Through Friday, Feb. 26
MESAROS GALLERIES: “Conjunction” Faculty Show
Fourteen WVU School of Art and Design faculty members spent the past two years working with printmakers at Artists Image Resource (AIR) in Pittsburgh to produce original art projects. Now they will display their interdisciplinary works the Creative Arts Center’s Mesaros Galleries. Titled “Conjunction: Projects by WVU School of Art and Design Faculty,” the show opens Jan. 25 and continues through Feb. 26. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday, from noon to 9:30 p.m. The galleries are closed Sundays and University holidays. Special individual or group viewing times may be arranged upon request.

Mark your calendars:

Ongoing

ART MUSEUM OF WVU: Inaugural Exhibition: Visual Conversations: Looking and Listening
The Art Museum of WVU is open to the public Wednesday through Sunday, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. For more information, visit http://artmuseum.wvu.edu.

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
This year, West Virginia University will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Visit http://artsandhumanities.wvu.edu for more information and a calendar of events.

Meredith Dincolo
Meredith Dincolo in Blanco by Hubbard Street Resident Choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo.
Photo by Christopher Duggan.

Meredith Dincolo is the Artistic Associate/Coordinator of Pre-Professional Programs at Hubbard Street Dance in Chicago. She’s also one of the guest choreographers for “this semester’s “Dance Now! concert and has given our students a wonderful opportunity to work with someone from the outside, thus learning from a variety of professional perspectives. We had the opportunity to hear about Meredith’s process as well as her experience at West Virginia University.

How did your collaboration with WVU begin? is your piece going to be completely Hubbard Street Dance dancers or are you utilizing WVU Students?

Meredith: One of my colleagues, Pablo Piantino, referred me to Yoav [Kaddar, director of dance at WVU] as a candidate for the student work; Pablo taught for the summer intensive at WVU last year and introduced me to Yoav. From there, I submitted some of my work for consideration. The work is independent from Hubbard Street in that I used only students from the university—but I was not limited to dance majors only; in fact, I have several dancers in my work who are not dance majors.

Talk a little bit about your background. Where you began, how you started at Hubbard Street Dance, etc. Is there a specific method or teacher that you adhere to or that your choreography is based on?

Meredith: I was trained primarily in classical ballet throughout my youth and early career. While studying English and French at the University of Notre Dame, I danced with a small youth company in South Bend, and found that I missed being devoted to dance completely. I moved to Chicago in 1993 to pursue dance as a career, eventually learning about Hubbard Street and began training in other disciplines to expand my versatility as a dancer. My investment eventually paid off, and I was selected (after my third audition!) to join the main company in 1996. My choreography does not come from a single influence or inspiration; I’d wager it has some elements of the work I’ve done with other choreographers, and from the way I inherently move—but I strive to let it have its own voice and identity, which is further infused by the originality of the dancers who perform the work. It often wanders far from my original ideas.

When you begin to choreograph a piece do you look at the people you have and create something based on that?

Meredith: There’s a bit of both, to begin. I came in with certain ideas I wanted to explore, and certain gestures and movements that started to evoke the atmosphere of the piece. We also generated some phrases with an idea given to the dancers that they were asked to interpret. Then we shaped that movement into the context of the piece. There’s even a bit of improvisation in the piece, which we experimented with ideas and imagery to guide those moments and helped them to connect to the work.

Do you begin with the music or a theme?

Meredith: I usually start out with a playlist of sorts—not certain which pieces of music will make the final cut, but with an idea of the flow and progression of the piece. For this work, I had several very different versions of the same song that I wanted to use.

Is the beginning inspiration the same every time or do you approach each piece differently?

Meredith: For this work, the original idea was inspired by the lyrics to the music; it was not a literal interpretation, but a point of departure, for the movement. Each piece tends to be different in its starting point—-sometimes the music inspires a quality of movement; or perhaps there is a need to express a certain feeling or emotion. Always different!

How has your collaboration with WVU students been?

Meredith: This was my first time working with the WVU students. We had five days, and about 25 hours, to create the piece, so we really had to dive in and get moving. Not too much time to spend getting to know each other. But in this very concentrated situation, I feel we were able to find our way quickly. Asking the dancers to improvise and to contribute to the creative process allowed for their strengths to emerge, and I tried to work with that. I saw certain partnerships that worked well; I gave them some homework the first day, and their ideas helped to shape sections of the piece—as I stated above, an ongoing collaboration.

What can you tell me and the audience about this specific piece for Dance Now? Themes, ideas, jumping off points? Anything additional you think is important about your piece/pieces.

Meredith: I so appreciate the openness and enthusiasm from both the dancers, and from Yoav and General, to bring this project together; everyone’s participation and dedication (production too—Cody and Alan) made this work. As for the piece, there are ideas of time, of passing through, of chance encounters, of curiosity and wonder, of being an outsider, alone within a group. The last day of work, we named the piece together, and I think Through Time conveys these themes and ideas with enough room to let the audience experience and interpret the work for themselves.

Your website states that “Hubbard Street Dance Chicago’s core purpose is to bring artists, art and audiences together to enrich, engage, educate, transform and change lives through the experience of dance” How does this statement, if at all, play into this collaboration with the WVU students?

Meredith: My current position with the company focuses on developing new programs for pre-professional dancers, many of which bring visiting students to our studios in Chicago. These programs are a starting point for carrying out this mission, and being able to work with the dancers at WVU brought Hubbard Street into the studios at the university. This is another important connective step in engaging young artists and expanding their experience of dance. It is a wonderful, symbiotic experience that educates everyone involved, and brings Hubbard Street into their world, and the dancers at WVU into ours.

The annual dance concert ‘Dance Now!’ is just around the corner and the Creative Arts Center is buzzing with anticipation for this spectacular event. Designers, crew, choreographers and dancers have been working around the clock this past week, and through the weekend, to get everything loaded into the space to tie technical elements into the dancing and the stories of each choreographer.

‘Dance Now!’ was created by Program Director and faculty of dance, Dr. Yoav Kaddar as a way to give students and faculty a way to explore their creativity as well as providing opportunity to work with outside professionals. When Dr. Kaddar arrived at WVU he went along with the previous model of having an annual dance concert in collaboration with designers; however, he dropped the idea of all pieces fitting into one theme as a way to create a more open environment to individual creativity. Kaddar explains, “It’s a sort of variety show in a way. There are all styles of dance involved, you don’t limit it. You don’t limit it in the style, in the concept, in the amount of dancers, or music. I want students to have the freedom to create and say what they want to say.” Kaddar is also a featured choreographer in ‘Dance Now!’ and has created a piece specifically for the freshmen class, to give the newcomers an opportunity to work with him at a professional level and to put their skills that they learn in the studio towards a performance. Additionally, Kaddar will be performing with his wife, and WVU Dance faculty, a brand new piece titled Paris, which is a new piece choreographed in honor of Paris after the recent attacks.

Another amazing opportunity for students and audiences is the guest appearance of Pittsburgh Ballet who will performing the legendary George Balanchine’s Serenade. It is rare opportunity for WVU to have the opportunity to present this beautiful piece, and will expose students and audience to a certain caliber of work. This piece will be nearly thirty minutes showcasing the strength, stamina, storytelling, and technique that are long standing traditions of dance. Professor of Dance General Hambrick states, ”’Dance Now!’ not only gives [students] an opportunity to collaborate with other students from other disciplines in our school but also gives them a glimpse into the professional world thanks to our relationship with Pittsburgh Ballet, who will appear as out guests on the program.”

However; opportunities do not end there. Several student choreographers will be featured in this year’s program. Senior Kelsey McKinny, double major in Spanish and Dance, talks about her excitement, “It really is such an honor for me to be chosen as a featured student choreographer in Dance Now! While it is great positive reinforcement for me as a choreographer, I am more excited for my incredibly talented dancers. I have a cast of 7 females and 1 male. They’re extremely talented and motivated individuals; amazing dancers, and people, inside and out.”

‘Dance Now!’ is creating opportunities for all disciplines within the School of Theatre and Dance. This is an opportunity for dance students to work with tech and design students, as well as give actors and singers an opportunity to participate and appreciate the work done by their fellow artists.

‘Dance Now!’ opens Thursday February 4th at 7:30pm and runs to Saturday February 6th at 2:00pm in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre.
Tickets can be purchased at ticketmaster.com, the CAC Box Office, and the Mountainlair Box Office

This Week @ the CAC: Feb. 1-7, 2016

David | February 1, 2016
1452893650

All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For more information about ticketed events, call 304.293.SHOW. For information about any College of Creative Arts events, call the Publicity Office at 304.293.3397. Events on this calendar are subject to change. For the latest information, see our web calendar at http://ccarts.wvu.edu.

All College of Creative Arts programs, services, and activities are accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations, call 304.293.4171.

Thursday, Feb. 4-Saturday, Feb. 6
DANCE NOW! Annual Concert
Students and faculty are hard at work rehearsing an eclectic and electric evening of choreography with the annual ‘Dance Now!’ concert. The event gives students in WVU’s dance program the opportunity to see their own works receive a full staging, to collaborate with guest choreographers, and to experience the work of guest ensembles. The concerts will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4-6, in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre in the Creative Arts Center. For tickets and information, please contact the WVU Box Office at 304-293-SHOW.

Through Friday, Feb. 26
MESAROS GALLERIES: “Conjunction” Faculty Show
Fourteen WVU School of Art and Design faculty members spent the past two years working with printmakers at Artists Image Resource (AIR) in Pittsburgh to produce original art projects. Now they will display their interdisciplinary works at the Creative Arts Center’s Mesaros Galleries. Titled “Conjunction: Projects by WVU School of Art and Design Faculty,” the show opens Jan. 25 and continues through Feb. 26. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday, from noon to 9:30 p.m. The galleries are closed Sundays and University holidays. Special individual or group viewing times may be arranged upon request.

Mark your calendars:

Ongoing

ART MUSEUM OF WVU: Inaugural Exhibition: Visual Conversations: Looking and Listening
The Art Museum of WVU is open to the public Wednesday through Sunday, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. For more information, visit http://artmuseum.wvu.edu.

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
This year, West Virginia University will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Visit http://artsandhumanities.wvu.edu for more information and a calendar of events.

WVU gets ready to "Dance Now!"

David | January 29, 2016
Dance Now 2015

West Virginia University students and faculty are hard at work rehearsing an eclectic and electric evening of choreography with the annual ‘Dance Now!’ concert.

The event gives students in WVU’s dance program the opportunity to see their own works receive a full staging, to collaborate with guest choreographers, and to experience the work of guest ensembles. The concerts will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4-6, in the Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre in the Creative Arts Center.

According to Yoav Kaddar, director of the dance program in WVU’s School of Theatre & Dance, this year’s concert will feature 28 students from the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s school program performing George Balanchine’s “Serenade.”

Meredith Dincolo of Hubbard Street Dance in Chicago has choreographed an original piece for the concert. According to Kaddar, “Bringing in a guest choreographer gives our dancers the opportunity to work with professionals and make connections.”

According to Kathleen Sweat, a dance major from Cross Lanes, W.Va., working with a guest artist is “a really special experience. You learn to pay close attention to what they ask for and how to be adaptable. That’s very important in the dance field in order to get hired, and to be easy to work with all around.”

The process of learning the dance was intense. “There were days when some of us were in the studio for eight hours,” Sweat said. “It’s awesome because it gives you a taste of what it’s like to be in a professional environment and what a ‘work day’ would be like.”

The concert will also feature three works by WVU faculty and six pieces choreographed by students, chosen from the 13 presented in the fall “Celebration of Dance” concert.

One of those pieces is by Kelsey McKinney, a dance and Spanish major from Cleveland. “It really is such an honor for me to be chosen as a featured choreographer,” she said. “There’s nothing like watching your choreography grow and turn into something so much bigger and better than anything you could have imagined.”

McKinney’s piece features eight dancers, whom she describes as “extremely talented and motivated individuals, amazing dancers and people, inside and out.”

Her piece is modern dance that emphasizes simple patterns and shapes. Her brother, a composer and musician out of Ann Arbor, Mich., composed music especially for the piece.

In addition to their fellow dancers, Kaddar noted that the students also get the opportunity to work with a team of designers to create a fully realized stage performance, enhancing the professional experience for them.

The concert will also feature younger performers from Morgantown’s Pizzazz Dance Academy.

For tickets and information, please contact the WVU Box Office at 304-293-SHOW.

This Week @ the CAC: Jan. 25-31, 2016

David | January 26, 2016
Fo Sho by Dylan Collins

All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For more information about ticketed events, call 304.293.SHOW. For information about any College of Creative Arts events, call the Publicity Office at 304.293.3397. Events on this calendar are subject to change. For the latest information, see our web calendar at http://ccarts.wvu.edu.

All College of Creative Arts programs, services, and activities are accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations, call 304.293.4171.

Monday, Jan. 25, through Friday, Feb. 26
MESAROS GALLERIES: “Conjunction” Faculty Show
Fourteen WVU School of Art and Design faculty members spent the past two years working with printmakers at Artists Image Resource (AIR) in Pittsburgh to produce original art projects. Now they will display their interdisciplinary works at the Creative Arts Center’s Mesaros Galleries. Titled “Conjunction: Projects by WVU School of Art and Design Faculty,” the show opens Jan. 25 and continues through Feb. 26. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday, from noon to 9:30 p.m. The galleries are closed Sundays and University holidays. Special individual or group viewing times may be arranged upon request.

Wednesday, Jan. 27
LUNCHTIME LOOK: Art Museum Docent Cookie Schultz
Students, faculty and staff, and members of the general public are invited to bring a brown bag lunch to the Museum Education Center Grand Hall at noon and meet with other art enthusiasts to enjoy their midday meal. At 12:30 p.m., the group will move to one of the museum’s galleries for a 20-minute, in-depth look at a work of art with one of the docents. This time, Art Museum docent Mary Louise “Cookie” Schultz will discuss Walter Quirt’s “Mural Study for John Reed Club” (1934).
The session will be over by 12:50 p.m., so that those who need to get back to their offices will have plenty of time. Anyone who can’t get away for the entire hour is welcome to meet the group in the museum’s upstairs gallery at 12:30 p.m. for just the art presentation.

Thursday, Jan. 28

GALLERY TALK: School of Art & Design Faculty
School of Art & Design faculty will present a Gallery Talk about their works in the ongoing “Conjunction” exhibition in the Mesaros Galleries on Thursday, Jan. 28, at 5 p.m. at the Galleries, with the opening reception following at 6 p.m. in the main lobby of the CAC. All events are free and open to the public.

ENSEMBLE RECITAL: Wind Symphony, Men’s Chorus, Brass and Percussion Ensembles
An upcoming performance by the West Virginia University Wind Symphony and Men’s Chorus will feature the customarily eclectic program of music. It will also give one graduate student the chance to show what he’s learned in WVU’s School of Music. Stephen Lane, who is pursuing a Master’s of Music in Conducting, will lead the entire program, conducting the seven diverse pieces. The concert, which is free and open to the public, will begin at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 28, in the Gladys G. Davis Theatre in the Creative Arts Center.

Mark your calendars:

Dance Now! Feb. 4-6
Visiting Artist Lecture Feb. 11
High School Honors Band Concert Feb. 13

Ongoing

ART MUSEUM OF WVU: Inaugural Exhibition: Visual Conversations: Looking and Listening
The Art Museum of WVU is open to the public Wednesday through Sunday, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. For more information, visit http://artmuseum.wvu.edu.

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
This year, West Virginia University will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Visit http://artsandhumanities.wvu.edu for more information and a calendar of events.

Due to potentially hazardous weather conditions, the West Virginia University College of Creative Arts has decided to cancel the auditions and portfolio reviews scheduled for this weekend, Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 23 and 24. Recruitment personnel have reached out to affected students and are in the process of rescheduling auditions. New dates will be added to the schedule and will be announced on the College’s web site when finalized.

Auditions are also scheduled for early February and will be held at the WVU Creative Arts Center. Dance major auditions will be held on Feb. 5. Music auditions will be held on Feb. 6. Auditions for theatre, art and design majors will be held on Feb. 6.

For more information on the audition process, please read this overview at WVU Today.

This Week @ the CAC: Jan. 19-24, 2016

David | January 19, 2016
ThisWeek-Graphic

All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For more information about ticketed events, call 304.293.SHOW. For information about any College of Creative Arts events, call the Publicity Office at 304.293.3397. Events on this calendar are subject to change. For the latest information, see our web calendar at http://ccarts.wvu.edu.

All College of Creative Arts programs, services, and activities are accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations, call 304.293.4171.

Thursday, Jan. 21
DEEM DISTINGUISHED ARTIST LECTURE: Jason Freeny
An artist who specializes in “candy colored madness” will present the Deem Distinguished Artist Lecture at West Virginia University. Jason Freeny, an artist who specializes in sculpture, designer toys, and computer generated imagery, will speak at 5 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 21, in Bloch Learning and Performance Hall, 200A Creative Arts Center. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Thursday, Jan. 21, through Saturday, Jan. 23
PLAY: “Real Girls Can’t Win”
Body image concerns, social insecurity, the lure of over-indulgent parties—it’s just another day for the average college female. Brimming with humor and a powerful message, the School of Theatre and Dance will present Real Girls Can’t Win – by Merri Biechler at 7:30 p.m. in the Gladys Davis Theatre. Admission is free for Real Girls Can’t Win, but seating is limited.

Friday, Jan. 22
GUEST ARTIST RECITAL: The Aspen String Trio
Morgantown audiences will get a rare opportunity to see one of the nation’s foremost string ensembles in a recital on Friday, Jan. 22. The Aspen String Trio will perform at 8 p.m. in Bloch Learning and Performance Hall, 200A Creative Arts Center. The recital is free and open to the public. The trio will perform a transcription of Johann Sebastian Bach’s Goldberg Variations, originally written for harpsichord. They will also conduct a chamber music tutorial featuring WVU’s graduate string quartet from noon to 1 p.m. Friday in the Antoinette Falbo Theatre in the Creative Arts Center.

Friday, Jan. 22, through Sunday, Jan. 24
OPERA NOIR! An Evening of One-Acts
The School of Music will blend the high drama of opera with the dark notes of crime in this year’s evening of one-acts, “Opera Noir!” The ensemble promises an evening when love and murder are never black and white. They’ll perform Kurt Weill’s “The Seven Deadly Sins,” Paul Hindemith’s “There and Back,” and Gian Carlo Menotti’s “The Medium.” Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 22, through Sunday, Jan 24, in the Antoinette Falbo Theatre in the Creative Arts Center. For tickets and information, call the WVU Box Office at 304-293-SHOW.

Mark your calendars:

Ongoing

ART MUSEUM OF WVU: Inaugural Exhibition: Visual Conversations: Looking and Listening
The Art Museum of WVU is open to the public Wednesday through Sunday, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. For more information, visit http://artmuseum.wvu.edu.

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
This year, West Virginia University will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Visit http://artsandhumanities.wvu.edu for more information and a calendar of events.

Body image concerns, social insecurity, the lure of over-indulgent parties—it’s just another day for the average college female. Brimming with humor and a powerful message, the West Virginia University School of Theatre & Dance will present seven performances of Real Girls Can’t Win by Merri Biechler.

Assistant Professor Bryce Britton will direct the play, and performances will be in the Gladys Davis Theatre. The performance times are Thursday through Saturday, Jan. 14-16, at 7:30 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 17, at 2 p.m., and Thursday through Saturday, Jan. 21-23, at 7:30 p.m.

College freshman Katie considers herself a “real girl,” but when beauty queen and member of the “Slut Movement” Dakota announces she’s running for “Miss Freshman B Dorm,” Katie joins the race in the name of “Real Girls” everywhere. But in an age of internet images and instant fame, how does a girl stay real? And what does the word “slut” truly mean?

As war rages, the battle between the Real Girls and Copy Girls quickly becomes ruthless. Everything from sex for power to body image to drug use and humiliation are at play – that is until the reality of a shamed student’s suicide after a night of binge drinking makes everyone re-evaluate what really matters in life.

Real Girls Can’t Win enjoyed a very successful run last spring with the LAB Theatre, having to turn away students at nearly every performance. The play is returning this spring, and although some cast changes have occurred, the story is still something every student should see.

Real Girls was a very moving experience for me. I see so much of real life in the play and the passion of the students. Thank you for sharing this evening with me,” said WVU President E. Gordon Gee.

Playwright Merri Biechler is an Adjunct Professor of Playwriting and Text Analysis in the Theater Division at Ohio University. Her plays include Tammy Faye’s Final Audition, Bombs, Babes and Bingo, Clubbed Thumb (Biennial Commission Finalist) and Confessions of a Reluctant Caregiver (Princess Grace Award finalist.) Real Girls Can’t Win is the winner of the Centenary Stage Company’s 2009 Women Playwrights Series.

Admission is free for Real Girls Can’t Win, but seating is limited. Attendance forms for classes will be made available.

For more information on this production, or to organize a performance of Real Girls Can’t Win, please visit theatre.wvu.edu, call 304.293.2020, or email theatre@mail.wvu.edu.